One Year Later…

img_1387A year ago today I closed an amazing chapter of my life and opened a new one to adulthood and the “real world”! This year has brought loads of changes, life lessons, and adventures. Following graduation, I moved back home to my parents’ house which is a huge adjustment in itself. I also had to give up dance and became distant from my sorority; both things that I ate, slept, and breathed throughout my college career. I accepted my first corporate desk job which has been a whirlwind, and has taken a toll on my body — when they say your metabolism decreases after a certain age, they aren’t kidding.

Long story short, adjusting to post-grad life can be difficult. So, in true Kourtney form, here is some advice for those graduating this year and moving on to bigger, better things:

1. People will walk out of your life after graduation. Sometimes it’s because you live too far away, or minimal effort put in by both parties. If you thought having a social life in college was hard, just wait until you move away from all of your college friends and you all have 9-5 jobs. This was one of the HARDEST lessons that I learned this year after being around my close friends nearly 24/7. Just know that your closest friends will still make an effort to be in your life.

2. Don’t be afraid to take risks in the job market. I won’t sugarcoat it — finding a job post-grad is difficult. Luckily, I found my current job just a couple months after graduation, but I never in a million years thought I would end up where I currently am.

3. Take the time to take care of yourself both physically and mentally. It’s easy to forget to take care of your body once you’re no longer walking miles across campus and don’t have a free gym right at your fingertips (well, at least we did at OU). As aforementioned, I didn’t realize just how much having a desk job would take a toll on my body. Between regular desk snacking, and sitting all day, I discovered the importance of getting in some sort of workout on a daily basis and eat healthy. Also, mental health days are definitely necessary; make sure you relax outside of work, and try not to let it run your life.

4. Do not stress about student loans. This is one thing that I cannot stress enough! The same day I graduated, I had a total mental breakdown about not having a job right out of college and seeing the amount of zeros following how much I owed back in loan payments. Something that I’ve learned since is that coming out of college with debt is absolutely normal. Educate yourself on the various options you have to pay back your loans and choose the one that works best for your situation.

5. Don’t forget to have fun. Yes, being a “full-on” adult sucks. Remember that although you may be working your ass off in the office, you NEED to take time to enjoy time with your friends and loved ones. Eat cake, drink champagne, and celebrate your hard work; life is too short to be miserable!

Congratulations to the graduating class of 2017!

-K.

Do’s and Don’ts: Professional Networking Events 


This month I’ve been fortunate enough to attend a few professional networking events, and, fun fact, this was my first professional networking experience outside of a college career fair. All this time, I believed that etiquette was simply common sense; however, there’s always that person that manages to slip up and talk about something wildly inappropriate for such an event.

Being a former sorority woman, I learned the vast majority of my networking skills from recruitment, and I found it helpful to read a few articles prior to the event. While it isn’t necessary to read articles upon articles about how to act and what to discuss at the event, it doesn’t hurt to prepare beforehand. Much of the advice in the articles is common sense, but there are always those people that need to hear it more than once.

Here are my do’s and don’ts for professional networking events.

Do:

  • Prepare, prepare, prepare – you’ll need a brief elevator speech to explain yourself and what you do; ex. “Hello my name is ________ , I’m the (state your position) at (place of work). (Briefly explain what your company does)”. You also may want to research on the company hosting the event or the companies attending so that you can carry on conversation.
  • Dress for success – try on your outfit the night before just to make sure everything fits properly and looks appropriate.
  • Get an ample amount of sleep the night before, especially if it’s a particularly long event, such as sorority recruitment, as you don’t want to be rude by spacing out or nodding off at times.

 

Don’t:

  • Talk about the three b’s – boys, booze, or beliefs – this one is pretty self-explanatory.
  • Portray a negative attitude – even if the topic of conversation is something you don’t particularly care for; try to politely steer the conversation in a different direction.
  • Name drop – it’s incredibly rude

What rule of thumb do you stick to at professional networking events?

– K.

 

Practicing Positivity

Practicing Positivity

If you’ve been keeping up on current events you’ll know that the world has been a bit of a mess lately (to put it lightly). The war rages on in the Middle East, there have been countless senseless killings and mass murders, and an unbearable amount of hate going on make it a scary place to live in. This brings up the question: how are we supposed to radiate hope and be positive in a time like this?

At the beginning of the year, I promised myself I would be less cynical and began practicing positivity and gratitude. I began avoiding the negativity in my life; this included people, thoughts, messages, and words. I admit, it’s difficult to be positive every second of every day. I still have trials and tribulations, and people and circumstances that annoy or hurt me, everyone does. But it’s the fact that I’m taking the step toward living a more positive life that counts.

In my practice to live a more positive life, besides just thinking more positively, I’ve tried to be more conscious about what I’m posting on the internet. I began to post happy and inspirational posts or re-post things I find funny rather than things that will work people up. For example, I love politics, but if I post something political on Facebook or Twitter, odds are that I’m going to receive some nasty comments that are looking to start a fight. Which leads me to my next point: pick your battles. You don’t need to fight about everything you disagree with, sometimes it’s best to walk away and ignore a situation.

Furthermore, start focusing on doing something for someone at least once a day. You may make a huge difference in someone’s life without evening knowing it. Try to do a random act of kindness every day– it will help you and the other person feel an amazing sense of worth and happiness. If you’re religious, regardless of your religion, even sending up a prayer for someone or for the world as a whole can make the slightest difference. One of the best pieces of advice I’ve ever received is to not underestimate the power of prayer.

Finally, do things that make you happy to be alive, and surround yourself with people that love you and help you grow everyday.

Take care of each other and God bless.

-K

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Surviving My First Post-Grad Job: Week 1

Surviving My First Post-Grad Job: Week 1

Hi everyone!

Last week was my first full week at my first post-grad job. It was exciting, it was overwhelming, it was fun, and it was work. I got lucky because I’m working in a brand new marketing position at the company my dad has been working at for the past 20+ years. While I have the opportunity to help mold the position, it’s still intimidating being my first job and having a lot of expectations to live up to (i.e. daddio).

Sneakpeek of my desk

Before I started, I found myself reading articles with titles along the lines of “How to succeed at your first post-grad job” and “10 things to know before starting a job.” They all had fairly the same lessons in all of them: dress appropriately, be prepared, get enough sleep, be organized, etc.Most of them seem like common sense, but you don’t realize just how much the smallest details help in the corporate world.

Here are a few tips that really helped me get through my first week on the job:

  • Prioritize your work.
  • Get to know your colleagues even if they aren’t in your department.
  • Take notes.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions.
  • Plan your outfit and pack your lunch the night before so you aren’t scrambling in the morning.
  • If you’re having computer problems, it really helps to have a friend in IT.
  • Also, get those computer problems taken care of ASAP or you’ll fall behind in your work and piss off your boss.
  • Know how to clock in and out properly so you don’t have a minor heart attack when all of your hours aren’t on your time card. Not that I know from experience or anything…
  • To-do lists are your best friend.

What are some tips that helped or are helping you through your first job? Feel free to share your tips with me; I’m always looking for advice!

-K

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Senior Thoughts During Finals Week

Senior Thoughts During Finals Week

As my time as a college undergrad comes to a close, I’m finding myself reminiscing about these past four years. When they say that college goes by fast, they’re not kidding. As I sit here writing this to avoid actually studying for finals, I have some final thoughts that I’d like to share about my days in college that will [hopefully] help y’all in your future endeavors.

  • Go Greek! I’m not being dramatic when I say that this is the best thing that ever happened to me. Greek life has made me a leader that I never thought I could be, and has given me friends that will be there for the rest of my life.
  • Get involved. Because I got involved, I got a second chance at pursuing my passion for dance.
  • When will I ever learn to not procrastinate? Don’t be like me and create a habit of procrastinating early on in your college career.
  • If you need help, ask for it. I’m still having a hard time learning this.
  • I’m almost 22 and still wondering where my Hogwarts acceptance letter is. It probably got lost in the mail or something. What I’m trying to say is never give up hope that something great is coming.
  • It’s okay to go through tough times and lose yourself, college is the time to make mistakes and learn from them.
  • Always work to make today better than tomorrow in all aspects.
  • Work hard and keep striving no matter how hard things get.
  • Dance parties are necessary at all times of the day.
  • Be careful who you trust, not everyone wants to be your friend.
  • Get to know your professors.
  • Get an internship – or 3 – you can only learn so much in the classroom. Real world experience in the workforce will teach you so much more.
  • Be kind, you never know what someone is going through.

While I could probably write a novel about all of the things I’ve learned in college, this is all I’ve got for now.

Take care of yourselves and good luck on finals!

-K

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